The Inquiring Mind - Introductory Philosophic Studies Herbert Martin

ISBN: 9781406715156

Published: March 1st 2007

Paperback

292 pages


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The Inquiring Mind - Introductory Philosophic Studies  by  Herbert Martin

The Inquiring Mind - Introductory Philosophic Studies by Herbert Martin
March 1st 2007 | Paperback | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, audiobook, mp3, ZIP | 292 pages | ISBN: 9781406715156 | 8.15 Mb

The Inquiring Mind INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHIC STUDIES by HERBERT MARTCN Professor of Philosophy, State University of Iowa NEW YORK BARNES NOBLE, INC. By BAJRJSTJES TsTOJL, E, tHe Unitedl Sta. t e of FOREW ORD LET No ONE DELAY said Epicurus, to studyMoreThe Inquiring Mind INTRODUCTORY PHILOSOPHIC STUDIES by HERBERT MARTCN Professor of Philosophy, State University of Iowa NEW YORK BARNES NOBLE, INC. By BAJRJSTJES TsTOJL, E, tHe Unitedl Sta. t e of FOREW ORD LET No ONE DELAY said Epicurus, to study philosophy while he is young, and when he is old let him not become weary of the study for no man can ever find the time unsuitable or too late to study the health of his soul.

And he who asserts either that it is not yet time to philosophize, or that the hour is past, is like a man who would say that the time is not yet come to be happy, or that it is too late. In terms of this dictum the writer offers this book. It is intended primarily as a text for all college students, whether young or old, lower-or upper-classmen, who are interested in a beginners course in philosophy.

It should prove of interest to non-college men as well. On the other hand, there is an increase of interest in the study of philosophy. The writer has found a growing number of college fresh men urgently asking admission to an introductory course in philosophy, which course is usually open only to sophomore and more advanced students. Furthermore, courses in philosophy are being offered in many of the best junior colleges and why not, since graduates of standard junior colleges are admitted to junior standing in colleges and univer sities In view of this growing constituency it was felt that a text with appeal to all such students, embracing the major concepts and prob lems of philosophy, should be prepared.

Again, because of the intimate relation between philosophy and the sciences, advances in the latter often yield material of great value in dealing with basicphilosophic issues. This requires the revision of older and the occasional writing of newer texts. For these reasons the present work was undertaken. The difference between this and other introductory texts is not so much in content or subject matter, but rather in that throughout an effort was made to present as far as possible in simple, nontechnical, and straightforward manner the main themes as they arise in experience and confront any thoughtful student, whether of junior or senior college level, interested in current philosophic thinking.

The reader will readily sense a social interest as flavoring the text throughout. My obligations are manifold. I was originally urged to the prepara tion of such a manuscript by Mr. Charles Frederick, a Graduate Assistant in the deoartment. Later I was creatlv aided bv mv col leagues, Professor Sellars and Dr. Bergmann, by their reading of chapters and by their constructive criticism.

I am deeply indebted to Mr. Troy Organ, a Graduate Assistant, and to Mr. Alden Salstrom, a Research Assistant, for source material, references, and other forms of aid. And, of course, without the assistance of my secretaries, Miss Roberts and Miss Green, the mechanical details could never have been accomplished. In spite of all this the shortcomings in the text are mine. Reference books for collateral reading are listed at the end of the chapters.

Appendix A contains a glossary of those terms that might offer some difficulty to beginners. It was thought that a list of authors quoted or referred to, and their dates, might prove helpful. This is found in Appendix B. Further, I gratefully acknowledge my indebted ness to publishers for the privilege of using briefexcerpts from their publications.

In footnotes the texts quoted with specific references are given A selected bibliography is given in Appendix C. H. M. IV TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION Page Chapter I. EVERY MAN A PHILOSOPHER 3 1. Philosophy Not a Foreign Importation 2.

Data of Experi ence a. Facty b. Values, -3. Conclusion. PART PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT Chapter II. RELATIVITY, 15 1. Original Data and Primitive Adventure 2. Emerging Prob lems a. Direction and Distance b. Rest and Motion c. Meas urement d. Duration e. Royces Time-Span 3. Relatedness and Relativity...



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